“I think that human self-consciousness is a misstep in evolution. We became too self-aware - nature created an aspect of nature separate from itself. We should not exist by natural law. We are things that labour under the illusion of having a self; an accretion of sensory experience and feeling, programmed with total assurance we are each somebody, when in fact everybody is nobody. Maybe the honourable thing for our species to do is deny our programming, stop reproducing and walk hand in hand into extinction. One last midnight - brothers and sisters stepping out of a raw deal.” 
—RUST COHLE
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“I think that human self-consciousness is a misstep in evolution. We became too self-aware - nature created an aspect of nature separate from itself. We should not exist by natural law. We are things that labour under the illusion of having a self; an accretion of sensory experience and feeling, programmed with total assurance we are each somebody, when in fact everybody is nobody. Maybe the honourable thing for our species to do is deny our programming, stop reproducing and walk hand in hand into extinction. One last midnight - brothers and sisters stepping out of a raw deal.” 
—RUST COHLE
Zoom Info

I think that human self-consciousness is a misstep in evolution. We became too self-aware - nature created an aspect of nature separate from itself. We should not exist by natural law. We are things that labour under the illusion of having a self; an accretion of sensory experience and feeling, programmed with total assurance we are each somebody, when in fact everybody is nobody. Maybe the honourable thing for our species to do is deny our programming, stop reproducing and walk hand in hand into extinction. One last midnight - brothers and sisters stepping out of a raw deal.” 

RUST COHLE

Wanna make a monster? Take the parts of yourself that make you uncomfortable - your weaknesses, bad thoughts, vanities, and hungers - and pretend they’re across the room. It’s too ugly to be human. It’s too ugly to be you. Children are afraid of the dark because they have nothing real to work with. Adults are afraid of themselves.

Black Telephone (Richard Siken)

erikkwakkel:

Making Shakespeare
Today in 1616 William Shakespeare died. His works have been enjoyed by generations of readers, which means that generations of printers have been busy editing and reprinting his texts. The images above are special. They are from the 1791 edition of The Bard’s “dramatic works”, as the title page has it, which included his play Richard III. Except, these images don’t show the actual book. You are looking at the proofs corrected by the editor George Steevens himself, which miraculously survived.
The proofs show the editor at work. Using the 1790 text of Malone as a basis, Steevens changed Shakespeare’s words into what he thought was the best text to print. Words were deleted (“guilty” and “murder” are crossed out), clarifications were added (a character exited “with the body”, penned next to it), and entire passages appear to have been rewritten (note the pasted pieces of paper with Steevens handwritten text). The proofs seen here show how Shakespeare is prepared for a new generation of readers: his words were perfected to reach a new audience - and new potential buyers.
Pic: Washington, Shakespeare Library, PR2752 1791-1802a v.1 Sh.Col. (This Shakespeare edition of 1791). Here is my source and more information.
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erikkwakkel:

Making Shakespeare
Today in 1616 William Shakespeare died. His works have been enjoyed by generations of readers, which means that generations of printers have been busy editing and reprinting his texts. The images above are special. They are from the 1791 edition of The Bard’s “dramatic works”, as the title page has it, which included his play Richard III. Except, these images don’t show the actual book. You are looking at the proofs corrected by the editor George Steevens himself, which miraculously survived.
The proofs show the editor at work. Using the 1790 text of Malone as a basis, Steevens changed Shakespeare’s words into what he thought was the best text to print. Words were deleted (“guilty” and “murder” are crossed out), clarifications were added (a character exited “with the body”, penned next to it), and entire passages appear to have been rewritten (note the pasted pieces of paper with Steevens handwritten text). The proofs seen here show how Shakespeare is prepared for a new generation of readers: his words were perfected to reach a new audience - and new potential buyers.
Pic: Washington, Shakespeare Library, PR2752 1791-1802a v.1 Sh.Col. (This Shakespeare edition of 1791). Here is my source and more information.
Zoom Info

erikkwakkel:

Making Shakespeare

Today in 1616 William Shakespeare died. His works have been enjoyed by generations of readers, which means that generations of printers have been busy editing and reprinting his texts. The images above are special. They are from the 1791 edition of The Bard’s “dramatic works”, as the title page has it, which included his play Richard III. Except, these images don’t show the actual book. You are looking at the proofs corrected by the editor George Steevens himself, which miraculously survived.

The proofs show the editor at work. Using the 1790 text of Malone as a basis, Steevens changed Shakespeare’s words into what he thought was the best text to print. Words were deleted (“guilty” and “murder” are crossed out), clarifications were added (a character exited “with the body”, penned next to it), and entire passages appear to have been rewritten (note the pasted pieces of paper with Steevens handwritten text). The proofs seen here show how Shakespeare is prepared for a new generation of readers: his words were perfected to reach a new audience - and new potential buyers.

Pic: Washington, Shakespeare Library, PR2752 1791-1802a v.1 Sh.Col. (This Shakespeare edition of 1791). Here is my source and more information.